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Apr 11Liked by Judson Stacy Vereen

I miss Christopher Hitchens. Every damn thing about the man. As you said Hitchens was a one of a kind. If you know of anyone today that has his intellect, humor( abrasive) , speaks with candor, can corner and absolutely render another persons position null and void, by using logic, something that seems to have disapeared in many a debate, or conversation on a variety of topics.

The world is a lesser place without Christopher Hitchens

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Right on. Yes......thanks Mark!

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Apr 12Liked by Judson Stacy Vereen

There are other public intellectuals, but he was oozing with more charm than he knew what to do with. A rare blend of brilliance, moral courage, charm and humor. Always a rare combination to be sure, but in 2024 he feels more like a dinosaur or a unicorn, as moral cowardice is the status quo even in situations that would’ve knocked sense into most of us even 15 years ago. I’ve been comfort watching his old debates lately too. RIP CH and thanks for the post.

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You are correct. Love this. Sometimes I will put his old debates on as ambient atmosphere, lol.

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I heard him speaking just once, in Little Rock, on the God is not Great tour. He was scintillating--though I've since come to think that some of his arguments were not as sophisticated as I thought at the time. You probably know Martin Amis' novel The Pregnant Widow, which was inspired by him. It's pretty brilliant, a return to Amis at the top of his form, and gives an idea of what the man must have been like to know personally.

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I am glad you got to hear him. He loved the states so much. As for his arguments, I think they articulate something instinctual in fellow atheists. He certainly gives a great wording to ideas and thoughts about the existence (or lack thereof) of god that are already hovering somewhere in the mind. At least, for me. But I am a lifelong nonbeliever. I was an atheist way before I knew who Hitchens was. So I never had the opportunity to approach his ideas from the other side of the argument. I don't know how convincing he (or any atheist) could be to a believer. I mean it- I simply don't. And I really appreciate the book reminder of the Pregnant Widow, which I have not read but ought to.

Thank you, by the way, for reading some of my works. I appreciate that immensely, as well as your publication's recommendation of my own. Very kind of you!

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You're welcome. He was a terrific speaker, better than Dawkins. I was a lifelong atheist too, but have come to the conclusion that most atheists have an oversimplified idea of what God might mean. I think the New Atheists were rightly attacking a very crude, childish conception of God, as perpetrated by many Christian fundamentalists. But I've since come to think that if we see God as Nature--as Spinoza did, and Einstein, and I think many of the great twentieth century physicists--then it's hard to refute. But the personal God of the Bible, with his favourites and punishments, while entertaining, and in some ways metaphorically instructive, can't correspond to reality, I agree.

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