7 Comments

Khrushchev and Gorbachev both believed in communism (even as they pursued policies of glasnost and perestroika) and thought that Stalin had bastardized Leninist norms and ideals, forgetting that it was Lenin who first suggested putting dissenters in concentration camps. I find a similar train of forgetting among my millennial contemporaries: this thinking that there’s a pure form of communism or socialism. It’s never worked out without authoritarians at the helm. They never want to mention how moving to these systems always involves taking things away from people.

Expand full comment

The first time I read Marx the thing that struck me most was the absolute distain for human nature. I say distain, because nothing he wrote supported it. The Marxist systems of Socialism and Communism are fantasy without the absolute destruction of human nature.

As you point out, both systems can work on a small scale, with likeminded people, but that's where it ends. Maren Schmidt came up with The Rule of 150 based upon human observation and study, which I believe to be true and the fundamental reason Marx was just a lazy bum that didn't want to work.

Expand full comment

Great essay. Adam has certainly put together a great platform for writers who get to the meat of their subject without the fat that is really piling on some otherwise excellent substack writers. I used to get a newsletter on architecture. One proposed project received an award for envisioning an apartment building with a large garden to feed the tenants which would alleviate the problem of food shortages. The garden would be tended by the tenants. I can't remember the exact phrasing but it could have been written by Karl Marx himself. It was chilling to say the least, especially as it presumed food shortages. At the time I thought what did that architect know that I don't know? Well I know now as well and it is pretty scary.

Expand full comment